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Publications

The Centre lists all publications and papers from our researchers and associates.  Where copyright prohibits us from providing the full document, we provide a link to where you will find the paper. You may use our search categories -on your left- or search with your own criteria -above. 

The post-communist privatisation of state flats to sitting tenants has transformed Romania into a nation of homeowners; yet its popularity appears perplexing given the poor quality of the stock and disappointing, given flat-owners’ subsequent lack of action regarding home improvement. Conversely, self-builders’ proactive agency moved them up the housing ladder. While this striking contrast draws attention to various structural conditions, which have constrained the former and enabled the latter, it also raises intriguing questions on residents’ meanings of home. By interrogating 48 homeowners’ narratives, this paper sustains the multilayered and multi-scalar meanings of home, which intertwine the socio-cultural territory of family and nation; the physical frame of one room or several dwellings; the emotional domain of object-memories; and the ontological realm epitomised by something as minimal as ‘my bed’. Findings demonstrate that flat-owners and self-builders do not significantly differ in their meanings of home but detached houses rather than flats facilitate more fully their appropriation.

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Soaita A M, 2014, "Overcrowding and ‘underoccupancy’ in Romania: a case study of housing inequality" Environment and Planning A 46(1) 203 – 221

This paper examines aspects of space consumption in two very different housing types, the communist mid-rise estates and post-communist suburban self-built housing. Examining residents’ perceptions in order to categorize space as overcrowded or under-occupied, the paper engages critically with the issue of the inefficient distribution of Romanian housing, that is a considerable mismatch between dwelling and household size. The analysis documents the continued salience of overcrowding in the communist estates and conversely, self-builders’ satisfaction with the generous size of their new homes. Market forces permit various modes of residential mobility but their likely outcome is growing housing inequality while any redistributive impact will remain insignificant unless policy incentives could facilitate conversion of under-occupied space into (social) renting housing. However, only a sustained delivery of larger and affordable new dwellings could alleviate overcrowding.

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Published online: 18 January 2014
In: Applied Spatial Analysis and Policy, © Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

In this paper, we examine household residential mobility within Colombian municipalities and determine whether the factors that trigger residential movement vary across the country. Using Geographically Weighted Regression (GWR) and detailed data from the 2005 Census for all municipalities in Colombia, our analysis takes into account the spatial variation in the relationship between household residential mobility and the associated housing, socioeconomic and environmental factors derived from theory and previous empirical research. Our findings demonstrate that household residential mobility is strongly and positively associated with living conditions, age and income, and negatively associated with homeownership and household composition within municipalities. The comparison of global (Ordinary Least Squares regression) and local (GWR) parameter estimates reveals the presence of a non-stationary effect on household residential mobility for the predictor variables considered, and highlights the importance of local variation of the relationships. In addition to contributing to the debate on the dynamics of residential mobility in Colombia, the study results have implications for effective policy-making with regard to urban expansion and settlement of various groups.

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In this paper, we document the experience of Moroccan emigration from Spain as a result of the bursting of the property bubble and the country’s long recession. Although Moroccans remain one of the largest non-European immigrant groups in Spain different forms of emigration such as return migration or remigration to third countries have become more prominent since the onset of the economic recession. In order to describe recent trends of international migration we use flow and stock data from the National Statistical Office for the period 2008-2011 with age-sex detail and information on the main destination countries and provinces of departure. The paper concludes with some considerations on the impact of Spain´s ongoing economic recession on the future of Moroccan migration within the European context.

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Article published in the Spanish journal 'Migraciones' - December 2013

The main objective of this paper is to analyse the transformation of host communities (those that are mainly inhabited by people born in Spain) and the formation and evolution of ethnic residential enclaves in Spain. For this purpose, this investigation has employed a time series (2000-2010) of detailed population data disaggregated by sex, age and country of birth of residents in all census tracts, the smallest geographies in Spain.

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The Centre for Housing Research has released a research report “Growing Economies and Building Homes”. The report examines the impacts of University led growth on the rental housing market in North East fife. The report was to the University of St Andrews and Fife Council. Lead author: Professor Duncan Maclennan.

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Community-led housing organisations innovate in the resolution of local housing issues by adopting a specialised local focus and emphasising community leadership and engagement. In order to meet their objectives they require access to finance, skills and legitimacy; resources that are often secured through frameworks of intermediary support and external partnerships. This article uses two sector-based case studies of community land trusts (CLTs) and self-help housing to explore the importance and effect of intermediary support in securing access to these resources. These sectors have grown in size and importance in recent years through different forms of intermediation that replicate community-led housing in different locations. The article compares the 'scaling-up' of CLTs and the viral spread of self-help housing, highlighting differences in the emphasis that each approach places on community leadership and links with technical experts. We then discuss the implications of this for future housing initiatives and wider relevance for facilitating community-led innovation. Volume 4, Issue 3 of Voluntary Sector Review (November 2013)

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Full reference:
Soaita, A. M. (2013). Book review: 'Social Housing across Europe' by Noémie Houard (Ed) Paris: Imprimerie de la Direction legale et administrative, 362 pp.; €20 paperback, ISBN 978-2-11-008849-9, Urban Studies, 50(10).

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Dr Tom Moore has published a new working paper titled ‘Scaling-up or going-viral: comparing self-help housing and community land trust facilitation’. The paper is co-authored with Professor David Mullins at the Third Sector Research Centre, University of Birmingham. It explores the recent growth of community land trusts and self-help housing initiatives to see which forms of support have been effective in helping them flourish and discusses the implications of this for their future development.

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What can we learn, from international best practice and from within the UK, that could help support the expanded financing of affordable housing supply?

This report reviews international evidence from selected case studies, as well as examples from specific UK nations. It also looks in detail at a small set of specific promising case study policies.
• in a challenging fiscal context, innovation is needed to stretch limited public subsidy and increase private contributions to help deliver additional affordable housing.
• the evidence review indicates that in order to encourage new investment, supply is likely to be at the affordable rather than the social housing end of the spectrum. This is despite the pressures on Housing Benefit and high and increased levels of housing need.
• While interesting ideas that are worth exploration and possible transfer are evident, financial measures such as those discussed here need to be understood in a wider policy context of housing system failure and the continuing need to support new housing for those on low incomes

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