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Publications

The Centre lists all publications and papers from our researchers and associates.  Where copyright prohibits us from providing the full document, we provide a link to where you will find the paper. You may use our search categories -on your left- or search with your own criteria -above. 

New research into the housing and social impact of community land trusts (CLTs) has been published by the Centre for Housing Research. The study, funded by the British Academy and conducted by Dr Tom Moore, highlights the important role performed by CLTs in developing affordable homes held in community ownership, and suggests key mechanisms that can support their future growth.

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In many countries, the demographic shift towards an ageing population is occurring against a backdrop of welfare state restructuring. The paradigm of asset-based welfare may become increasingly central to these developments as individualised welfare is touted as part of the response to the challenge of funding the care of an ageing population. This article focuses on the framing of housing wealth as a form of asset-based welfare in the UK context. We consider the strengths and weaknesses of housing as a form of asset-based welfare, both in terms of equity between generations and equality within them. We argue that housing market gains have presented many homeowners with significant, and arguably unearned, wealth and that policy-makers could reasonably expect that some of these assets be utilised to meet welfare needs in later life. However, the suitability of asset-based welfare as a panacea to the fiscal costs of an ageing population and welfare state retraction is limited by a number of potential practical and ethical concerns.

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Drawing on papers from a recent ESRC seminar series of the same name, this special issue edited by McKee offers a critique of contemporary UK political and policy debates relating to the Big Society and housing policy. By drawing out wider narratives around localism, empowerment, citizenship and welfare reform the special issue also has a much broader, international relevance beyond the devolved policy context of the UK. It features papers from Dr Tony Manzi (University of Westminster); Prof. Keith Jacobs (University of Westminster); Prof. John Flint (University of Sheffield); and a co-authored paper by Dr Peter Matthews (University of Stirling), Prof. Glen Bramley (Heriot-Watt) and Prof. Annette Hastings (University of Glasgow).

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Low pay, high house prices and a small rental sector mean that the housing market in the UK has many inherent risks. Few households have enough savings to cover their housing costs for more than a month if they lost their job. Growing numbers of households rely on the safety net to prevent them becoming homeless if they fall on tough times. Successive governments have made changes to the housing safety net so that it now provides less support to fewer people.
Mindful of these trends, Shelter commissioned the University of St Andrews to assess the gaps in the UK’s current housing safety net. The research estimates the number of households falling through the net or at risk of falling through, the characteristics of those at risk and the main risk factors leading people to fall through the net.

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Albert Sabater (CHR) and Nissa Finney (University of Manchester) have contributed to the book entitled Social-spatial segregation: Concepts, processes and outcomes. This edited volume brings together leading researchers from the United States, the United Kingdom and Europe to look at the processes leading to segregation and its implications. With a methodological focus, the book explores new methods and data sources that can offer fresh perspectives on segregation in different contexts. It considers how the spatial patterning of segregation might be best understood and measured, outlines some of the mechanisms that drive it, and discusses its possible social outcomes. Ultimately, it demonstrates that measurements and concepts of segregation must keep pace with a changing world.

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Drawing on papers from across the seminar series as a whole this briefing explores the possibilities, opportunities and challenges localism offers to community-based and non-profit housing in the UK, whilst highlighting the nuances and subtleties that exist in different jurisdictions according to the devolved nature of policymaking and local contexts.

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Drawing on presentations given across the seminar series as a whole this briefing paper (no 1) explores the interconnections between the Big Society, and that of the current welfare reform agenda being advanced by the UK coalition government.

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There is an extensive literature on UK regional house price dynamics, yet empirical work focusing on the duration and magnitude of regional housing cycles has received little attention. This paper employs Markov Switching Vector auto regression (MSVAR) methods to examine UK house price cycles in UK regions at NUTS1 level. The research findings indicate that the regional structure of the UK house market is best described as two large groups of regions with marked differences in the amplitude and duration of the cyclical regimes between the two groups. These differences have implications for the design of both macroeconomic and housing sector policies.

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Empirical studies mainly model monetary transmission mechanism and housing prices as being
symmetric across business cycles. However, as the degree of asymmetric information varies with
the state of the economy such notion of a symmetric impact may be incorrect. This paper using
United Kingdom data captures the asymmetric shocks of macro variables on UK house price
from 1980 to end of 2012, employing Markov-switching vector autoregressive (MS-VAR) model
and regime dependent impulse responses. The results suggest that the effect of traditional
monetary policy is not neutral and the impact varies significantly during boom and bust periods.
These findings lead us to believe information asymmetry plays an important role in the economy
and in monetary transmission mechanism.

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A policy paper by Darja Reuschke and Duncan Maclennan which summarises a seminar on Business Investment and Housing which was jointly organised by CHR and the Scottish Government. This seminar was part of a research project about the consequences of the mortgage crisis on small businesses.

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