Share



Private Rental Markets and Policies


The Immigration Act 2016 aims to constrain illegal immigration by relying on collaboration from
employers, service providers, and workers in the public and private sector, as well as from members
of the general public. In this way, the government is fostering a culture of enforced cooperation
towards the policing of undocumented migrants; to collectively create a ‘hostile’ environment, or
more recently, what the current UK Government calls a ‘compliant’ environment. However, this Act
is controversial as the implementation of its measures has had unintended consequences, with
potential for further negative implications.

view the work

Low pay, high house prices and a small rental sector mean that the housing market in the UK has many inherent risks. Few households have enough savings to cover their housing costs for more than a month if they lost their job. Growing numbers of households rely on the safety net to prevent them becoming homeless if they fall on tough times. Successive governments have made changes to the housing safety net so that it now provides less support to fewer people.
Mindful of these trends, Shelter commissioned the University of St Andrews to assess the gaps in the UK’s current housing safety net. The research estimates the number of households falling through the net or at risk of falling through, the characteristics of those at risk and the main risk factors leading people to fall through the net.

view the work

The Centre for Housing Research has released a research report “Growing Economies and Building Homes”. The report examines the impacts of University led growth on the rental housing market in North East fife. The report was to the University of St Andrews and Fife Council. Lead author: Professor Duncan Maclennan.

view the work

The objectives of this commissioned report were to identify and examine housing need and housing pressures in St Andrews and to outline recommendations as how these may be addressed. Following interviews with local organisations and housing providers, a survey of students and resident households and an interrogation of census and local authority demographic (especially age structure) and housing data (house prices, rent charges etc.), two dominant problems were identified: the shortage of affordable housing and the (over) concentration of student accommodation (HMOs – Housing in multiple occupation) in the centre of the town. The report’s recommendations – partially based on experience elsewhere, especially in other university towns - included: the drawing-up of a detailed housing strategy for the town by Fife Council in collaboration with community representatives to cover, inter alia: the development of an appropriate yardstick for student housing density, and the continuation of and a geographical extension of the present HMO moratorium; the construction of additional student accommodation by both private providers and by the University; and the development of a programme for affordable housing provision starting with the designation and development of a ‘social/mixed housing village’ at the Kilrymont site of Madras College when this becomes available.

view the work

Research into the spatial structure and functioning of local housing markets typically focuses on market outcomes, particularly house price changes and household movement patterns. Explanatory models are usually based upon a standard neoclassical analysis of the housing market. That approach de-emphasises the importance of imperfect information, real market processes and the signals they generate. The inherent nature of housing means that partly informed households typically engage in search activity prior to purchasing a property. Search is inevitably a spatial process. Housing market search modelling remains relatively undeveloped. However, analysis of this process can provide important additional insights to both better explain consumer behaviour and support more informed decision-making by housing planners and market providers. We illustrate these arguments using housing search data for Scotland.
(Journal of Property Research 29:4, pp324-340, Routledge, London)

view the work

Homeownership has become a ‘normalised’ tenure of choice in many advanced economies, with housing playing a pivotal role in shifts from collective to asset-based welfare. Young people are, however, increasingly being excluded from accessing the housing ladder. Many are remaining in the parental home for longer, and even when ready to ‘fly the nest’ face significant challenges in accessing mortgage finance. This under-30 age group has become ‘generation rent’. As this policy review emphasises, this key public-policy issue has created a source of inter-generational conflict between ‘housing poor’ young people and their ‘housing rich’ elders. To fully understand the complexities at play however, this paper argues that we need to look beyond the immediate housing-market issues and consider how housing policy interacts with broader social, economic and demographic shifts, and how it is intimately connected to debates about welfare. This is illustrated with reference to the UK, although these debates have international resonance.

view the work

This paper explores the implications of observed national housing sector experiences across the advanced economies before, through and out of the ‘Great Financial Crash’ (GFC) of 2008. The evidence suggests that over-aggregative explanation of these experiences and their broader economic consequences is somewhat misleading; empirical and theoretical explanations to date have largely failed to recognise that housing sectors can play transformative rather than just passive roles in shaping national economic out- comes. In practice, housing volatility, and the implications of this volatility for macro- economic stability and growth, reflects specific national financial, spatial and policy structures, housing system institutional structures and participant behaviour patterns. In spite of this, the housing policy paradigms that dominated in the decades prior to the GFC remain largely in place, and national housing policy frameworks continue to give insufficient attention to housing system stability and efficiency concerns. Housing research and housing policies need to be reoriented to better address the processes that contributed to the GFC and that more generally continue to shape national economic cycles and growth paths.
(2011, Journal of Housing and the Built Environment, Springer: Dordecht)

view the work

[Maclennan, D. (1999) Private Rental Housing in Europe: Sectors or Niches. Netherlands Journal, January]

[Maclennan, D., Priemus, H. (1998) Private Rental Housing in the Advanced Economies: Contrasts and Commonalities. Netherlands Journal of Housing and the Environment.]


First Prev 1 Next Last