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Demographics, mobility and residential choices

Demographics, mobility and residential choices

The Immigration Act 2016 aims to constrain illegal immigration by relying on collaboration from
employers, service providers, and workers in the public and private sector, as well as from members
of the general public. In this way, the government is fostering a culture of enforced cooperation
towards the policing of undocumented migrants; to collectively create a ‘hostile’ environment, or
more recently, what the current UK Government calls a ‘compliant’ environment. However, this Act
is controversial as the implementation of its measures has had unintended consequences, with
potential for further negative implications.

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This research, published by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, explores differences between ethnic groups in labour market participation (unemployment, employment and hours worked) and employment status (low, mid and high skilled occupation levels) for those in work.

It examines whether there is ‘clustering’ into particular occupations for some ethnic groups, and looks at how much geography matters for employment and job status for different ethnic groups.

Appendix 6, which was not included in the full report due to space limitations, can be downloaded here:

http://ggsrv-cold.st-andrews.ac.uk/CHR/Uploads/Edit/file/Appendix%206_CatneySabater_Final.pdf (please copy and paste address into a web browser)

It contains all graphs and tables for all ethnic groups and not only the ones selected for the final JRF report.

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In many countries, the demographic shift towards an ageing population is occurring against a backdrop of welfare state restructuring. The paradigm of asset-based welfare may become increasingly central to these developments as individualised welfare is touted as part of the response to the challenge of funding the care of an ageing population. This article focuses on the framing of housing wealth as a form of asset-based welfare in the UK context. We consider the strengths and weaknesses of housing as a form of asset-based welfare, both in terms of equity between generations and equality within them. We argue that housing market gains have presented many homeowners with significant, and arguably unearned, wealth and that policy-makers could reasonably expect that some of these assets be utilised to meet welfare needs in later life. However, the suitability of asset-based welfare as a panacea to the fiscal costs of an ageing population and welfare state retraction is limited by a number of potential practical and ethical concerns.

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Albert Sabater (CHR) and Nissa Finney (University of Manchester) have contributed to the book entitled Social-spatial segregation: Concepts, processes and outcomes. This edited volume brings together leading researchers from the United States, the United Kingdom and Europe to look at the processes leading to segregation and its implications. With a methodological focus, the book explores new methods and data sources that can offer fresh perspectives on segregation in different contexts. It considers how the spatial patterning of segregation might be best understood and measured, outlines some of the mechanisms that drive it, and discusses its possible social outcomes. Ultimately, it demonstrates that measurements and concepts of segregation must keep pace with a changing world.

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Published online: 18 January 2014
In: Applied Spatial Analysis and Policy, © Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

In this paper, we examine household residential mobility within Colombian municipalities and determine whether the factors that trigger residential movement vary across the country. Using Geographically Weighted Regression (GWR) and detailed data from the 2005 Census for all municipalities in Colombia, our analysis takes into account the spatial variation in the relationship between household residential mobility and the associated housing, socioeconomic and environmental factors derived from theory and previous empirical research. Our findings demonstrate that household residential mobility is strongly and positively associated with living conditions, age and income, and negatively associated with homeownership and household composition within municipalities. The comparison of global (Ordinary Least Squares regression) and local (GWR) parameter estimates reveals the presence of a non-stationary effect on household residential mobility for the predictor variables considered, and highlights the importance of local variation of the relationships. In addition to contributing to the debate on the dynamics of residential mobility in Colombia, the study results have implications for effective policy-making with regard to urban expansion and settlement of various groups.

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In this paper, we document the experience of Moroccan emigration from Spain as a result of the bursting of the property bubble and the country’s long recession. Although Moroccans remain one of the largest non-European immigrant groups in Spain different forms of emigration such as return migration or remigration to third countries have become more prominent since the onset of the economic recession. In order to describe recent trends of international migration we use flow and stock data from the National Statistical Office for the period 2008-2011 with age-sex detail and information on the main destination countries and provinces of departure. The paper concludes with some considerations on the impact of Spain´s ongoing economic recession on the future of Moroccan migration within the European context.

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Article published in the Spanish journal 'Migraciones' - December 2013

The main objective of this paper is to analyse the transformation of host communities (those that are mainly inhabited by people born in Spain) and the formation and evolution of ethnic residential enclaves in Spain. For this purpose, this investigation has employed a time series (2000-2010) of detailed population data disaggregated by sex, age and country of birth of residents in all census tracts, the smallest geographies in Spain.

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The Centre for Housing Research has released a research report “Growing Economies and Building Homes”. The report examines the impacts of University led growth on the rental housing market in North East fife. The report was to the University of St Andrews and Fife Council. Lead author: Professor Duncan Maclennan.

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The objectives of this commissioned report were to identify and examine housing need and housing pressures in St Andrews and to outline recommendations as how these may be addressed. Following interviews with local organisations and housing providers, a survey of students and resident households and an interrogation of census and local authority demographic (especially age structure) and housing data (house prices, rent charges etc.), two dominant problems were identified: the shortage of affordable housing and the (over) concentration of student accommodation (HMOs – Housing in multiple occupation) in the centre of the town. The report’s recommendations – partially based on experience elsewhere, especially in other university towns - included: the drawing-up of a detailed housing strategy for the town by Fife Council in collaboration with community representatives to cover, inter alia: the development of an appropriate yardstick for student housing density, and the continuation of and a geographical extension of the present HMO moratorium; the construction of additional student accommodation by both private providers and by the University; and the development of a programme for affordable housing provision starting with the designation and development of a ‘social/mixed housing village’ at the Kilrymont site of Madras College when this becomes available.

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Research by St Andrews University and a group of international practitioners says radical thinking is needed to shape a new, entrepreneurial and thriving rental housing sector. The new research - led by Professor Duncan Maclennan and Sharon Chisholm for the Centre for Housing Research (CHR) at the University of St Andrews – calls for a more enterprising and innovative approach in housing alongside a continuing focus on supporting communities and help to improve people’s lives.
The study, New Times, New Business: Housing Provision in Times of Austerity, was being launched today (Friday 1 February 2013) at Glasgow Housing Association’s Training Academy in Glasgow city centre. GHA, which is part of the Wheatley Housing Group, was one of six partners in the research project.

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